LynnSchuette
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:: writings & reviews

"...Schuette's best paintings are hardly exercises in theory-driven, postmodern agitprop and rage triggered by the world's overabundance of atrocity. She knows how to handle paint, working the surfaces of her images with a sensuous fluid touch. Painting on canvas primed with black gesso, the artist works from dark to light and her figures often appear as if they are emerging from some crimson darkness... Schuette's collective imagery offers beautiful and scary expressions of the modern world at war with itself. It might be a shock to the system to find an artist creating from a sincere perspective of her political concerns without irony or detachment. However, Schuette's art tells us that all is not well as she balances horror with the beauty found in a vibrant painting."

:: Neil Kendricks
San Diego Union-Tribune

"Viewing Lynn Schuette's recent show of paintings and drawings…is to witness the wedding of Francis Bacon and Georgia O'Keefe into a completely original vision. Schuette has melded Bacon's preoccupation with the body to O'Keefe's meditations on landscape to create a sumptuously complex and inexplicable relationship between the two…. The quotes from Cormac McCarthy, particularly his novel Blood Meridian, provide a key to Schuette's work. McCarthy's Faulknerian imaginings of human and natural extremity, by turns beautiful and awful, find comparable expression in Schuette's paintings…these canvases, like a paragraph-long McCarthy sentence, conjure a surreal intensity through pure painting."

:: Charles Wilmoth
The Painterly Mystery of Landscape and Body

"The strength of vision in Lynn Schuette's paintings has always held me in awe…an immensely sophisticated style that has plunged through this century's modernism (O'Keefe, Kahlo, Hopper, de Chirico, Picasso, Redon) to the Renaissance and back…. The result is a breathtaking concision of the language of painting that allows for seamless mental transitions as the eye follows a line. The draftsmanship has such power that the work enters the mind whole: nevertheless, one is always seeing double…. Her line is executed with a surgeons hand, a surgeons sense of territory. Sometimes this seems almost literal: the vital muscularity of the body with its skin missing, the tissue glistening, where we see an act of will from the inside out, the gesture one with twisting muscles of an extending arm. One is on the edge of death and the test of one's strength with Lynn Schuette…. There is something particularly American about Schuette's transcendent drive."

:: Becky Cohen
A Woman Like An Excised Heart

"Because Schuette is a woman, because the human form she represents is female, and because ours is the era that it is, the temptation to view the work in terms of gender-based or feminist discourse seems, at first, appropriate and inevitable. But no such argument is being engaged here. This is not due to shyness, fear of the raw, or a concern for good manners, however. Instead, what comes through the paintings themselves is a feeling for and of the artist's comfort, satisfaction, appreciation and wonderment at being herself, at being female, at being human."

:: David Lewinson
Artweek

"Our relationship with nature is Lynn Schuette's preoccupation.... Her style, which owes a debt to the style of medical illustrations, sets up an intriguing tension between its cool demeanor and the heat, emotional and erotic, lurking within these carefully composed images."

:: Robert Pincus
San Diego Union-Tribune

"The hearts, lungs, spines and rib cages that recur in Schuette's work here appear as containers of life's energy, and these are Schuette's odes to them."

:: Leah Ollman
At the Galleries
Los Angeles Times

"Somehow her painted hearts beat, her painted muscles seem to tense up and the spines bend as if in movement. Schuette paints with an assurance and boldness that is refreshing."

:: Susan Freudenheim
Art Reviews
The Tribune